Thursday, April 4, 2019

D is for Durian


D is for Durian... that thorny fruit that tastes like heaven but smells like hell (to some).

If you visit Malaysia at the 'right' time when local fruits are ripe for the picking, second to third quarter of the year, you just might catch a whiff of some strange aroma in the air. Yep, that's our 'King of Fruits', the durian.

This is one fruit you either love it or hate it, even for locals.

Malaysian durians have grown in popularity in the last few years so much so durian fruit tourism is gaining traction. People travel on guided tours from as far as China, Taiwan and even the U.S. (I kid you not!) to savour the Malaysian durian when it is in season.

Prices of this fruit (which is sold by weight) has soared significantly as a result of its popularity. Malaysia now exports a bulk of the produce overseas mainly to China. A good amount of the fruit also ends up down south in Singapore where the fruit is just as popular.

The better species like the popular Musang King could go as high as between RM85 to RM100 (approx between USD21 to USD25) per kg. Each fruit can weigh from between 800gm to one-and-a-half kg. Durian-lovers look forward to a bountiful harvest each year which would result in a glut bringing prices down. We experienced that the last season.

Our durians come in different species ranging from the ordinary Kampung Durian to Red Prawn, D24, Musang King just to name a few. Durians in Malaysia are not plucked from the tree but are allowed to fall on their own when they ripen.

If you are wondering how a durian tree look like here are some images.. courtesy of Bing.

The durian fruit.. courtesy of Bing.

Come on! Give it a try when you are here. It's not that bad afterall. Richard Quest confirms it..


4 comments:

  1. Very interesting, Wish to see much more like this. Thanks for sharing your information!


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  2. Good to know about Durian by visiting your site. A to Z participant Narayana Rao Evolution of Operations Management

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  3. I live in Vietnam, and durians are always available at our local market. I don't mind the flavor in pastries or such, but haven't tried the fruit plain yet.
    Found you through AtoZ.
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  4. I wonder what one is like! What a distinctive look, too. Glad I found your blog through the A to Z Challenge.

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