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Sunday, July 12, 2009

Loafers to Give Your Feet a Break

Wearing heels is taxing on one's feet (and backbone), so I decided to fill my shoe-closet with a few more pairs of loafers the other day. I didn't buy just a pair or two. I have a strange habit of getting into a binge when shoe-shopping. To cut a long story short, I bought four pairs. My record is seven pairs of shoes at one go. Yeah, But they stretched for months and gave me a good rotation of shoes. Did you know that your shoes last longer if you give them time to take a break? Shoes need some time-off too.

"What are loafers?" This is a query I received on one of my posts. So as to be able to provide an accurate answer, I checked up an online dictionary and Wikipedia.

Before we go into the word loafer or loafers, let's look at the word 'loaf' and we are not talking about the bread or the meat here.

Loaf means to spend time idly, to pass time at leisure, to lounge around or simply bum about. Taking it real easy. Okay, lepak, if you will in our local lingo.

So, loafers would be shoes that you can just slip on - easy to put on and take off.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say about loafers:

Slip-on shoe
Slip-ons, are low, leather lace-less shoes. The style most commonly seen, known as a loafer in American culture, has a moccasin construction. First appearing in the mid-1930s from Norway, they began as casual shoes, but have increased in popularity to point of being worn in America with city lounge suits, though these still require lace-up shoes in more conservative locations such as Britain. They are worn in many situations in a wide variety of colours and designs, often featuring tassels on the front, or metal decorations (the 'Gucci' loafer).

So, do you wear loafers?

Btw, how do you break in a new pair of loafers or shoes for that matter. An old Chinese belief always works for me. You may scoff at the idea but it really works. You may want to try it.

Before we start wearing a brand new pair of shoes, we'd first give them a little nibble (both shoes). It's actually symbolically indicating that we'd bite the shoes so that they can't bite us. Yeah, laughable but it's worth a try nevertheless.


Image source: Wikipedia

5 comments:

  1. I don't wear loafers. Normally, I'll wear leather shoes to work, rubber shoes for lepak-ing and sports/jogging shoes for jogging and slippers for a night out at mamak or to the pasar malam. Haha! Where do loafers come in?

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  2. I have trouble just finding a shoe of any kind that will fit. My feet are short and wide, so usually shoes are too narrow - especially in Japan.

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  3. Foong, I only use slippers for driving. To each his own, I guess.

    Aww, PandaB, that is tough. I know how that is like. I have guy-friends who wear size 10/11 and whenever they come across one that fits, they'd quickly snap it up otherwise when it's time to look for a pair that fits, chances are, none is available.

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  4. is boat shoes or driving shoes, that usually slip on kinda shoes is also a loafers? hmm askin.. hehe

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  5. Hi Shamil, you're right. Any slip-on shoe is a loafer, basically shoes for you to loaf around in.

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